Artist Anthony Howe (previously) continues to amaze with his gargantuan kinetic sculptures powered by wind or motors that cycle continuously through hypnotic motions that resemble something between the tentacles of an octopus and an alien spacecraft.Weighing up to 1,600 lbs (725kg), each artwork is first built digitally to test how it will move and react to the force of wind once fabricated in the real world. Seen here are three new sculptures titled Di-OctoIn Cloud Light III, and Switchback. You can see more than one wind sculpture browsing his recent work in his portfolio.

Born in Salt Lake City, Utah, Anthony attended the Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut followed by Cornell University and the Skowhegan School of Sculpture and Painting.

He then built a house on a mountaintop in rural New Hampshire and painted watercolors and had several one man shows in Boston. A sense of unease in both the isolation and the subject matter of his paintings resulted in the selling of the house and a move to Manhattan. His new, part time occupation of erecting shelving for the storage of office records resulted in the discovery of a new medium, metal. Further exploration combined with previous interests in the wind and movement led to the making of kinetic wind sculptures. He then strung discarded elevator cables across local rooftops. On those cables he hung his first series of wind powered sculptures.

He now lives on Orcas Island, Washington, with his business partner wife. His work has sold in the Middle East, California, and many places in between. It has been showcased in palaces, sculpture parks, and the Barneys Christmas window in Manhattan. Most recently he designed the cauldrons for the Brazil Rio Olympics; one for the opening ceremonies and another, permanent, outdoor version that resides in the downtown section of Rio.

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